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US hockey GM dies unexpectedly at Colorado Springs home

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By STEPHEN WHYNO

Longtime USA Hockey executive and U.S. Olympic men’s hockey general manager Jim Johannson died unexpectedly Sunday at age 53, shocking the sport less than three weeks before the start of the Pyeongchang Games.

Johannson died away in his sleep at his home in Colorado Springs, according to USA Hockey. His death came in the midst of the most high-profile role in his career: putting together the U.S. men’s Olympic hockey team without NHL players going to South Korea, a position he relished after doing so at several world junior and world championships.

“He had a couple of the greatest days of his life at USA Hockey recently to be able to call all these guys that never thought in their lives they’d play on a U.S. Olympic hockey team, and he got to tell them that they realized a dream,” USA Hockey execute director Pat Kelleher said by phone. “I think that meant as much to Jimmy as it did to any of the players.”

With the NHL out of the Olympics for the first time since 1994, Johannson was excited about putting together a 25-man roster that would include “25 great stories.” He picked Tony Granato as coach and on Jan. 1 unveiled a diverse roster made up of players from European professional leagues, the American Hockey League and the NCAA.

Johannson was proud of the unheralded roster, one that will now try to capture a gold medal for him.

“I think it would be huge,” former USA Hockey executive director Dave Ogrean said by phone. “If we ever had a ‘Win one for the Gipper’ moment, this is it.”

It’s unclear who would be in charge of choosing any potential injury replacements if needed. The U.S. opens the Olympics Feb. 14 against Slovenia.

The talent pool now and in other tournaments is deeper in part because of Johannson, who has overseen the growth of hockey in the U.S. beyond the “Miracle On Ice” in 1980. Retired American-born forward Jeremy Roenick said, “USA hockey is a world power now because of people like Jimmy Johannson.”

The U.S. won 64 medals, including 34 gold, in major international competition during Johannson’s tenure. The Americans in particular became a perennial threat to win the world junior championship, showing the program’s improvement at the youth levels.

Carolina Hurricanes president Don Waddell said Johannson “has been a driving force in making both the USA Hockey men’s and women’s programs into consistent winners, and 2015 gold-medal-winning world junior coach Phil Housley said Johannson “grew our game to new heights.”

“In building the teams that achieved so much success for USA Hockey, Jim Johannson had a sharp eye for talent, a strong sense of chemistry and a relentless pursuit of excellence,” NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said. “As we mourn his loss, we will remember the positive outlook Jim brought to his tireless efforts to advance USA Hockey.”

Johannson, who played for the U.S. at the 1988 and 1992 Olympics, began working for USA Hockey in 2000 after spending five years as the general manager of the Twin Cities Vulcans in the United States Hockey League. He was promoted to assistant executive director of hockey operations in 2007, overseeing the organization’s efforts in fielding teams for international competition.

He played college hockey at Wisconsin and helped the Badgers win the NCAA championship as a freshman. He was selected by Hartford in the seventh round of the 1982 draft and although he never played in the NHL, he was respected and well-liked by those all over hockey.

“We lost a true friend in Jim Johannson today,” Granato said. “He was so compassionate and as loyal a friend as you could have. He was the ultimate teammate. I am deeply saddened and shocked and sorry that he is no longer with us. He was a special human being. Please pray for Jim’s wife and daughter, Abby and Ellie.”

Kelleher said USA Hockey would think about ways to pay tribute to Johannson at the Pyeongchang Games after grieving this loss.

“Today it’s really just trying to help his family as best as we can and really just try and honestly put one foot in front of the other,” Kelleher said. “We’ll have to see what we can do to try and honor him in some fashion.”

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Man who killed Sheldon Prawl in 2013 will spend nearly 50 years in prison

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“Sheldon tried to kill my sister,” Carleton Davis said to Prawl’s mother Beverly Daley as she read her impact statement to the court. 

“I have not only lost one child but two children, and if it was up to me, Davis and Cheri would receive the death penalty,” Daley said.

It took two weeks of trial and nearly 6 hours total of deliberation for a jury to convict 38-year-old Carleton Davis in the death of Sheldon Prawl. 

Today, Carleton Davis, 38, was found guilty of second-degree murder and felony concealment of death. Judge Imelda Pate told Davis that he would spend nearly 50 years in prison. He was sentenced to serve a total of 38-to-48 years in prison. Davis killed Sheldon Prawl in 2013 and put his remains in two-cement filled foot lockers outside a house in Detroit, Michigan. Police later found Prawl’s body after a neighbor reported a bad odor coming from the backyard. 

Davis sister Cheri Davis, has also been charged in the case. She was the girlfriend of Prawl. She has been charged with felony destruction of bodily remains to conceal a death, felony conspiracy, felony accessory after the fact, and felony common law obstruction of justice and she is out of jail on bond. 

Here’s what Carleton Davis had to say to the court before his sentencing BELOW:

Stay tuned to NewsInOnslow.com for all the latest.

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Man accused of killing Sheldon Prawl in 2013 won’t testify, evidence is circumstantial

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A man accused of killing Sheldon Prawl in 2013 will not testify in his murder trial.

Carleton Davis, 38, of Georgia, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of 23-year-old Sheldon Prawl.

In court, Assistant District Attorney Mike Maultsby said that Prawl was last seen on Halloween in 2013 and, shortly thereafter, 35-year-old Cheri Lee Davis, Carleton Davis‘ sister, reported him missing. Prawl’s body was found in Detroit, Michigan dismembered in two separate containers filled with cement on May 30, 2014.

In the States closing argument Wednesday afternoon, they spoke about the relationship between Davis and Richard Jackson, who lived next door to the home Prawl’s body was found. Jackson and Davis were pulled over in Brunswick County in 2014 on unrelated drug and gun charges.

“The case is a circumstantial evidence case. The circumstances, in this case, proves without a reasonable doubt that the defendant killed Sheldon Pawl,” Maultsby told the jury. 

Maultsby talked about how Prawl and his mother Beverly Daley spoke every other day and on October 31, 2013, she received a text message from Prawl’s phone saying “Travel, talk to you soon.” Davis said in her testimony that she gave it a few days before she contacted Cherri Davis, Prawl’s girlfriend on November 2, begging her to make a report to the police about her son missing. 

In the state’s closing argument, Maultsby told the jury that “Carleton Davis had a motive to end the life of Sheldon Prawl because he did not like what he did to his sister.” It took the state 58 minutes to argue their closing to the jury and the defense will argue their closing at 1:30 PM Wednesday afternoon. 

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District Attorney Earnie Lee receives case about officer who used ‘excessive force’ against Anthony Wall in Warsaw

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“No Justice, No Peace” is what Onslow County District Attorney Earnie Lee will hear if he does not indict the officer who ‘excessively with force’ arrested Anthony Wall in Warsaw, North Carolina on May 4, 2018.

Anthony Wall, 22, of Fayetteville was at Waffle House after taking his 16-year-old sister to prom in Warsaw, North Carolina when he was choked and slammed by Officer Frank Moss. It’s unknown why Officer Moss used such aggressive force against the 22-year-old, but I guess it’s better than the officer pulling out his gun and killing Wall.

Officer Moss has a history of abusing and terrorizing black families in Warsaw, North Carolina for years. If you look at how big Officer Moss is and look how small Anthony Wall is, there’s no way Moss couldn’t have subdued Wall without choking him. 

Officer Frank Moss

District Attorney Earnie Lee said on Tuesday that the investigation into whether Officer Moss used ‘excessive force’ or not is in his hands.

Lee said the report was received from N.C. State Bureau of Investigation regarding the controversial arrest of Anthony Wall. The evidence will be reviewed and a decision afterward.

District Attorney Earnie Lee

One of Wall’s attorney, Benjamin Crump said Wall’s arrest was a “gross violation of his civil and human rights.” Wall is also represented by Fayetteville lawyer Allen Rogers

(LEFT) Benjamin Crump, (Middle) Antony Wall (Right) Alex Rogers

The whole world will be watching District Attorney Earnie Lee’s office, and his decision could impact his career for the good or bad. 

 

 

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